0,3658,s=902?a=23624,00.asp
TiVo Gets Retail Push from Best Buy
Search    in           Advanced Search Ziff Davis Media
The Net Economy
Already a Member? Sign In Not a member? Join Now
Home My Account Sign In

Views

News

Industry Q&A

Markets

Networks

Revolutionaries

Services

Strategies

Free Subscription

May 20, 2002 -- cover
  • Check out the
          current issue
  • Past Issues


  • Newsletters
    Get The Net Economy’s
    FREE online newsletters!
    The Net Economy Update
    Network Services From Paul Coe Clark III
    Joe McGarvey�s Optical Networking Letter
    The Carol Wilson Report: The Business and Technology of Communications
    Preferred e-mail format:
    Enter your e-mail:

    Submit
    View All Newsletters




    News Section Header
    March 5, 2002
    TiVo Gets Retail Push from Best Buy
    The maker of personal video recorders, facing competition from network operators and other vendors, gets Best Buy shelf space in return for advertising.


    In a move to revitalize the troubled market for personal video recorders, leading PVR maker TiVo announced today a novel deal with retail chain Best Buy that swaps advertising space for a prominent position on Best Buys shelves.

    The two companies will create a “strategic sales agreement” under which the store will be the exclusive outlet for TiVo’s next-generation PVR, the Series 2, and will in turn be given an exclusive advertising showcase over the TiVo system.

    ADVERTISEMENT

    The deal calls for Best Buy to shoulder some of the marketing costs for pushing the new device to consumers.

    “What started out as place where TV networks pushed their programming is now evolving into an area where a Best Buy can get their advertising and new products to the market,” says Rebecca Baer, a spokeswoman for TiVo.

    Expect the new offering around May 2002.

    Personal video recorders came to market roughly three years ago with great fanfare from analysts, the press and industry. They allowed users to store live television, just as they would a VCR. But resistance from programmers, uneven marketing from box makers like TiVo and high costs have limited the appliances’ appeal.

    The lack of consumer interest, however, has not stopped both consumer electronics makers and network operators from rolling out similar PVR services. AOL Time Warner is committed to an ambitious network-based PVR system that will emulate TiVo capability over its cable network. And Sony, Pioneer, Thompson and other box makers are all adding new personal recording functionality to DVD players, set-tops and even directly to TVs.

    The Series2 TiVo DVR will offer about 60 hours of recording capacity. It will be built into a slick new form factor, will cost about $399, for orders placed directly to TiVo’s Web site beginning today.

         


     
    Email this Article
    Printer-Friendly Version

    RELATED ARTICLES  
    Cutting Out the Middleware
     
    TiVo Lands Some Dough
     
    Video Goes Rural
     
    On-Demand Video Options Multiply
     
    Streaming Video Hits Prime Time
     
    Lucent Backs Away from Video
     
    Video Inches Along
     
    Video Now for the Future
     
    Telco Video Stays Small
     

    NEWS  
    6:12PM
    MSPs Avasta, Siterock Merge
     
    5:53PM
    Nortel Trims Its Optical Networking Unit
     
    12:00AM
    Web Services Secure?
     
    5.29.2002
    Adelphia Crisis hits Vendors
     
    5.29.2002
    Rates for Streaming Audio Rejected
     
    MORE

    TECHtionary ON TNE 
      TECHtionary
     

    THE TNE 100 
    The index for the networked world
     

    TNE WEB EXCLUSIVES 
    Denise Culver:
    NTT’s American Dream
     
    Sarah Schmelling
    The Wide View of Storage
     
    Elizabeth
    Starr Miller:
    Good News for Metro Ethernet
     
    Dawn Bushaus:
    Thank Canada
     
    Jonathan Blum:
    The Devil Is in the Metadata
     
    Dawn Bushaus:
    XO Offers Microsoft Apps
     

    POLL 
    Is Cable Telephony a Credible Threat?
    1) Sure thing – just because Michael Armstrong couldn’t pull it off doesn’t mean it won’t work.
    2) Only if customers come to trust cable reliability as they do switched voice service.
    3) Nah.
    VIEW ALL POLLS


     SHOP NOW
    Find the products and prices you're looking for:
     
    Pick a Category:
    Shop by Keyword:

    Shop by Price Range:
    Powered by Nextag.com

    Sponsored Links
    advertisement
    Shop Now! - Dell Home Solutions Center

    Click here for Micron PC

    Sponsored Links
    Service Providers: Boost Revenue with HP. Let HP's sales force co-sell your services. Manage SLA's more easily, immediately roll-out pay-per-use computing and more.
    - The Economics of Cisco Metro IP Solutions
    - Metro IP Technology and Architecture
    - A Comparison Between IPSEC and Multiprotocol Label Switching Virtual Private Networks


    The Net Economy:
    Contact Us | About | Advertise

    Ziff Davis Media:
    About | Advertise | Newsletters | Magazine Subscriptions | eSeminars | Feedback
    Baseline | CIO Insight | Computer Gaming World | Electronic Gaming Monthly | eWEEK | ExtremeTech | GameNOW |
    Microsoft Watch | Official US PlayStation Magazine | PC Magazine | Ziff Davis Smart Business | The Net Economy | Yahoo! Internet Life
    Copyright © 2002 Ziff Davis Media Inc. All Rights Reserved.
    Reproduction in whole or in part in any form or medium without express written permission of Ziff Davis Media Inc. is prohibited.
    For reprint information: click here.
    Search this website